Crampton: Father Dale Crampton

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Dale Arden Crampton (Father Dale Crampton)

Father Dale Crampton 1974 (Ottawa Citizen file photo)

 Father Dale Crampton 1974 -Ottawa Citizen file photo 1986

Priest Archdiocese of Ottawa.  Ordained 1963.  1986 GUILTY plea to 7 counts of indecent assault. The seven male victims were all between the ages of 10 and 13 when they were molested.  The abuse transpired between January 1973 and December 1982 .Given a suspended sentence by Judge Keith Flanigan  and two years probation. Sentence appealed by Crown – sentenced to 8 months in jail.

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Archbishops of the Archdiocese of Ottawa from time of Father Crampton’s ordination: Marie-Joseph Lemieux, O.P. (29 June 1953 – 24 September 1966) ; Joseph-Aurèle Plourde(02 January 1967 – September 1989) ; Marcel André J. Gervais (Coadjutor Archbishop: 13 May 1989 – Archbishop: 27 Sep 1989 – 14 May 2007); Terrence Thomas Prendergast, S.J. (14 May 2007 – – )

Auxiliary Bishops: Paul-Émile Charbonneau (15 November 1960 – 21 May 1963); Joseph Raymond Windle  (15 November 1960 – 23 Jan 1969);  René Audet  (21 May 1963 – 03 January 1968); John Michael Beahen  (11 May 1977 – 14 March 1988); Gilles Bélisle (11 May 1977 – 19 August 1993); Frederick Joseph Colli (19 December 1994 – 02 February 1999); Paul Marchand, S.M.M. (31 May 1993 to 08 March 1999)

  Father Dale Crampton

  • Ordained  1963.
  • Incardinated in the Archdiocese of Ottawa.
  • Canon lawyer.
  • Honourary chaplain to RCMP
  • School Board trustee
  • spent time in Africa
  • worked as canon lawyer in Diocese of London Ontario after his sex abuse conviction
  • 2010:  living in the greater Ottawa area
  • 12 October 2010:  committed suicide

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R. v. Crampton (1987 Supreme Court of Ontario, Court of Appeal)

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18 April 2017:  Late Ottawa Catholic bishop who managed sex abuse complaints now accused of sex abuse

21 May 2016: “Archbishop: Church must do better, help to heal” & related article

20 May 2016:  BLOG Thank you Colleen

18 May 2016:  Ottawa diocese repeatedly warned about local clergy’s most notorious abuser

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Inquiry Classes in Archdiocese of Ottawa 1968 and 1971

Inquiry Classes in Archdiocese of Ottawa Fall 1968

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Unless otherwise indicated, the following information is drawn from Canadian Catholic Church Directories (CCCD) of that date, the 1980 Ontario Catholic Church Directory (OCD) and media (M)

12 October 2012:  Committed suicide – jumped to his death from balcony in high rise (M)

– the word was that he left very detailed instructions for his lawyer   –  NO wake.  NO Mass.  NO funeral.  At no time is the Archbishop of Ottawa to be involved in any way.

2002, 2000, 1999, 1998:  address and phone number for Ottawa Archdiocese Diocesan Centre (CCCD)

1997, 1996, 1995:  1070 Colborne St., London, Ontario (address for diocesan  Marriage Tribunal) Phone:  519-439-1553 (CCCD)  (Phone number for Diocese of London Canonical Services/Marriage Tribunal)

1994:  1070 Colborne St., London, Ontario (address for diocesan  Marriage Tribunal) – phone number not listed. (CCCD)

1993, 1992:  1070 Colborne St., London, Ontario (address for diocesan  Marriage Tribunal) Phone:  519-439-1553 (CCCD)  (Phone number for Diocese of London Canonical Services/Marriage Tribunal)

1991:  address c/o Diocesan Centre, London Ontario (CCCD) (he was working as a Canon Lawyer for the London Diocese)  (Bishop John Michael Sherlock)

Easter in 80s – sometime post incarceration:  functioning as a Canon Lawyer in the Diocese of London Ontario and assisting at St. George’s Roman Catholic Church.

Father Crampton was recycled into the Diocese of London, Ontario.  Bishop John Sherlock took this convicted molester into his diocese, allowed him to function  as a Canon Lawyer for the diocese and to assist at Masses.  He assisted at Masses at St. George.  A parishioner who recognized him and wound up defending the “raped children” while Bishop Sherlock berated her for “having no forgiveness in my heart for a recovering alcoholic.”   Read here what Arlene had to say about her disturbing encounter with Bishop Sherlock.

1986:   GUILTY plea to 7 counts of indecent assault. Given a suspended sentence by Judge Keith Flanigan  and two years probation. Sentence appealed by Crown – sentenced to 8 months in jail.

February 1986:  treatment centre in the States for alcoholism and sexual disorder

1985:  Pastor, St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church, Nepean, Ontario (CCCD)

1981:  holiday in South Africa (P)

1979:  MD alleges he was sexually abused by Bishop John Beahen at Father Crampton’s West Carleton cottage (M)

July 1977:  Appointed Pastor at St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church, Nepean, Ontario – effective 01 September 1977 (Clergy Appointments, Archdiocese of Ottawa 1977)

1976:  ? St Elizabeth Roman Catholic Church (?)  American priest living with him (P)

1974:  appointed as Pastor at St. Elizabeth’s Roman Catholic Church. Ottawa, Ontario (Archdiocese of Ottawa clergy appointments  06 June 1974)

1973-74:  Pastor, Saint Philip Roman Catholic Church, Richmond, Ontario (CCCD)

1974:  Fathers Crampton and Ken Keeler are first priests ever to be voted as school board trustees (Fathers Crampton & Keeler trustees ) (Father Keeler was charged and entered guilty plea in 1993)

1972:  Appointed as Pastor, Saint Philip Roman Catholic Church, Richmond, Ontario (Archdiocese of Ottawa clergy appointments 09 August 72)

1971-72, 1968-69:  Pastor, Our Lady of Divine Love (Mission church in Pendelton, Ontario) – address given as that of Diocesan Centre on Kilborn (CCCD)

27 July 1970Father Dale Crampton leaving for Malawi C. Africa (Pastoral Monthly, July-August 1970, Vol. 6)

1967:  St Margaret Mary Roman Catholic Church, Ottawa (Pastor Father W.J.Radley) (CCCD)

01 May 1967:  appointed as notary of the Regional Tribunal of Ottawa – to continue his duties as assistant at St. Elizabeth’s (Archdiocese of Ottawa new appointments 01 May 67)

1966:  assisting at St Margaret Mary Roman Catholic Church, Ottawa (P) (Pastor Father W.J.Radley)

14 August 1966:  In Pembroke Ontario for Grey Nuns holy habit and religious profession at St. Columbkilles Cathedral  ( to Pembroke for Grey Nuns Rites 27 August 1966 )

 – allegations of sex abuse of young altar boy at St Margaret Mary- abuse alleged  to have started in 1964 and continued until 1966 when the boy’s family moved to another parish (P)

1965:  assisting at St Margaret Mary Roman Catholic Church, Ottawa (Pastor Father W.J.Radley)

October 1965:  off to New York with Father John Beahen for the Papal visit.  Father Crampton to send back radio reports for CFRA (Fathers Crampton & John Beahen to New York for Papal visit )

1964:  assisting  at St Margaret Mary Roman Catholic Church, Ottawa (P)  (Pastor Father W.J.Radley)

 –  allegations of sex abuse of young altar boy (P)

1963:  ORDAINED

assigned to assist at Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Roman Catholic Church, Ottawa (Archdiocese of Ottawa clergy posts Journal)

Late 50s and early 60s: frequented St. Patrick’s orphanage in Ottawa where, according to one blogger with whom I spoke, he preyed upon vulnerable children, including her husband.  The Crampton family then took the boy in as a foster child – the abuse carried on for years at the Crampton home and at the cottage,

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Media coverage and other documents re sex abuse allegations and conviction of Father Dale Crampton

24 July 017:  “It killed part of me,” clergy abuse victim says

23 October 2010:  Obituary: Father Dale Crampton

14 October 2010:  City priest convicted of sexual assaults kills himself

14 October 2010:  Pedophile priest leaps to death

13 October 2010:  “Priest Accused in Sexual Assaults Takes Own Life” & “Priest convicted of sexually assaulting altar boys kills himself”

13 October 2010:  Pedophile priest jumps to his death

12 October 2010: BLOG Dead?

11 June 2009: Church blames victims’s lawyer for lawsuit 

21 July 2008:  “Pathetically, shamefully and disgustingly sickening

29 September 2006:  BLOG “Are Roman Catholic clerical sexual predators a protected species?”

Father Dale Crampton. Photograph by: John Major, The Ottawa Citizen

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Monsignor regrets lack of ‘reconciliation’; Vicar general said it was ‘sad’ sex-abuse victim refused to shake hands

The Ottawa Citizen

12 October 2009

Gary Dimmock

Msgr. Kevin Beach, vicar general of the Archdiocese of Ottawa, which last week gave refuge to a disgraced former bishop facing child pornography charges, issued a press release on Thanksgiving weekend declaring that it was “sad” that an altar boy who was sexually abused at age 14 refused to shake his hand at a mediation session.

The altar boy, whose name is protected by law, is now 40 and recently settled a lawsuit against the archdiocese for an undisclosed amount of money.

Beach issued the press release in response to a Citizen story on Saturday, which revealed that Alex, the victim, had settled out of court for the abuse he suffered at the hands of Rev. Dale Crampton dating back to 1982, when the priest presided over St. Maurice Church on Percy Street. Crampton was convicted four years later for sexually abusing seven altar boys. The judge sentenced the priest to eight months in jail.

The vicar general issued the rare news release to respond to the victim, who denounced the church’s apology as “feeble.”

The apology was part of the settlement.

The vicar general wanted the public to know that the archdiocese has long favoured a mediated process to its sexual abuse claims rather than litigation.

“Unfortunately, this (Citizen) story confirms that litigation is rarely a satisfactory approach when dealing with the anger and pain of abuse victims. It is why our diocese has had a protocol in place for many years favouring a mediated process which, in addition to independent legal counsel for the victim, provides an opportunity for victims to express their anger, pain and desire for healing. Once the litigation process is launched, we are obliged to follow the court process,” Beach said in a statement to the Citizen.

The Roman Catholic Church said on the weekend the settlement with Alex was settled “mutually on a very quick basis, in the hope that the healing of Alex would commence more quickly.”

But the victim does not view the situation the same way.

The case drew a lot of attention this past summer when Beach suggested that Alex only launched the lawsuit at his lawyer’s instigation.

“I would think that it was at his lawyer’s urging that this gentleman decided to launch a lawsuit, rather than communicate with us directly,” Beach said at the time.

The accusation still rattles Alex. He recalled a mediation session at which Beach was present:

“I walked into this meeting and this same man was standing there offering to shake hands like he’s my friend.”

In a rare public reply, Beach counters:

“On a personal note, I find it sad that Alex was not able to accept my handshake, not one of friendship, but as a gesture of reconciliation — a gesture which has been accepted in other cases. I hope and pray that he and his family find the peace and healing they deserve.”

On Friday afternoon, the archdiocese issued a brief statement from Archbishop Terrence Prendergast apologizing for the sexual abuse Alex endured from Crampton.

“I am grateful that we have come to an early and mediated settlement of the claim for, sexual abuse, of A.V.B. (Alex) against Dale Crampton and the Archdiocese,” Prendergast says in the statement. “This occasion gives me the opportunity to apologize to A.V.B. and to the other victims of Dale Crampton.

“Even though this particular incident dates from the early 1980s, we have all been made aware of the pain that these cases, involving sexual abuse and abuse of trust, have caused to the victims and to their families throughout the years. I state again the commitment of our diocese, and my personal commitment, to create a safe environment in the church for young people and for other vulnerable persons.”

Last week, Prendergast offered refuge for former bishop Raymond Lahey, who said he had nowhere else to live after being charged by Ottawa police with possession and importation of child pornography.

In an interview with police, Lahey told detectives he was attracted to males aged 20 to 21, according to court documents. A forensic examination, according to an Ottawa police search warrant, revealed alleged photographs of naked boys who appeared to be as young as eight on Lahey’s laptop computer, which was seized at the Ottawa airport on Sept. 15 when he arrived from Britain.

Lahey is now living near Billings Bridge at a priests’ residence.

[email protected]

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Sexual assaults by priest cost church $150,000

The Toronto Star

12 February 1990

Kevin Donovan

OTTAWA – Rev. Dale Crampton‘s sexual assaults of young boys cost the Roman Catholic church $150,000.

That was the Ottawa archdiocese’s financial penance for failing to act on a previous complaint against Crampton, and for not counselling his victims.

The settlement is believed to be the first of its kind in Canada and could set a precedent for future actions against the church, similar to those in the United States since the early 1980s.

Minnesota lawyer Jeff Anderson estimates the Roman Catholic Church in the United States has paid out as much as $90 million to victims of priests.

Anderson, of St. Paul, Minn., has handled numerous cases himself and regularly keeps in touch with more than 100 lawyers acting on other cases against the church “in virtually every state.”

He said many of the U.S. cases have been decided on the basis of whether senior church officials were warned of abuse in the past.

Catholic church officials, on discovery of child abuse complaints, have “historically” kept the priests in the clergy, Anderson said.

“Instead of reporting them to the police or booting them out of there like most any other institution, they have, out of loyalty to their own, just moved them around secretly,” he said in an interview.

Among the financial settlements in the United States:

* $15 million to 16 families in the case of a Lafayette, La., priest.

* An estimated $2.5 million to three victims and their families in Orlando, Fla.

* $375,000 to three boys abused by a priest in Springfield, Ill.

Canadian church officials interviewed by The Star say they hope parents and victims in this country will not follow the U.S. lead.

Valleyfield Bishop Robert Lebel, president of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, said the danger that the church will be sued is lessened if church officials report the complaints.

“If we follow the law there will not be lawsuits. (The priest) may be sued himself, but not the bishop,” Lebel said.

The three Catholic families in the Ottawa area who shared the $150,000 payout in the Crampton case did not make lightly the decision to sue their church, lawyer Bruce Carr-Harris said in a recent interview.

Placed on probation

“From the families’ perspective, they felt driven to seek a civil remedy because, having gone to the church for help after the assaults, they were shut out by officials, including the archbishop,” Carr-Harris said.

Crampton pleaded guilty in 1986 to seven counts of sexual assault involving altar boys aged 11 to 13 over a 10-year period dating back to 1973.

Diagnosed a homosexual pedophile, the 50-year-old Crampton was first placed on probation and ordered to continue treatment he’d started earlier that year. A crown appeal the next year increased his sentence to eight months in jail.

In the 1970s and early 1980s, Crampton was a respected man in the community, as priest, school board trustee and as honorary chaplain for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

So it was not unusual that parents allowed their sons to stay overnight at the rectories of his Golbourn Township or Nepean churches, or to spend the weekend at his Horseshoe Bay cottage.

Once there, Crampton would make advances, hug and French kiss the boys, then take them to bed and fondle their genitals, court transcripts show.

One boy’s victim impact statement to the courts said he did not yet know the full effects of the assaults. “I’ll let you know when I have kids,” the boy wrote.

But some of the boys would never have been assaulted if church officials had paid heed to an earlier complaint, according to evidence from the civil action launched by the families of three victims.

‘Every measure’

According to court records, Crampton had invited a 13-year-old altar boy to his cottage for a day of snowmobiling in 1979. After drinking heavily, Crampton got into bed with the boy and fondled him.

The next morning, the boy went home and told his mother, who contacted a prominent Ottawa psychiatrist for help. The psychiatrist, a Catholic who had done work for the church’s marriage tribunal, took the complaint to Ottawa Bishop John Behan.

According to the psychiatrist’s account at the civil discovery proceeding, Behan said he would “look into it and take every measure, even the most drastic, to see it is taken care of.”

After waiting several weeks for Behan to call, the victim’s parents, guilt-ridden because they had entrusted their child to Crampton, called and made their own appointment.

The parents say they explained the assault to Behan at a Feb. 16, 1979, meeting and he promised to correct the situation. It is not known what, if any, action was taken by Behan, but no report of the incident was made to police or children’s aid at the time.

More assaults followed over the next three years, including abuse of the three victims whose families launched the civil suit.

In her victim impact statement at Crampton’s 1986 criminal hearing, the mother of the 1979 victim writes: “(Bishop Behan) assured us that the matter would be dealt with following an investigation. It upset me very much that in subsequent years Mr. Crampton continued to operate within the Catholic church, performing the duties of a priest.”

‘Momentary weakness’

And the boy’s father writes: “It was only last summer when there was an indication that Dale Crampton had been involved with other children that I realized that based on statements from the archbishop’s office that nothing had been done with our report and, in fact, that it might have been suppressed by church officials.”

During the discovery portion of the civil proceedings, Behan (who died two years ago) denied hearing anything of the 1979 complaint.

However, Behan said some boys had complained in the mid-1960s that Crampton had exposed himself to them. Crampton neither confirmed nor denied the incident and Behan attributed it to a “momentary weakness,” according to the civil examination evidence.

Despite knowing the church had prior warning, the three families might not have sued if the archdiocese, after Crampton was charged, had shown sympathy and provided counselling for the victims, lawyer Carr-Harris said.

“But it was my clients’ view the church was moving to protect its own and was indifferent to the concerns of the families,” he said.

The only attempt made at counselling was when church officials sent one family to a local priest who told the parents it was the boy’s fault and “he must have liked it,” Carr-Harris said.

Although the civil action began in late 1986, the trial was not set until last October. On Oct. 11, the night before the jury was to be picked, the archdiocese settled out of court, paying the full $150,000 requested by the families.

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Priest denies lawsuit allegations

The Ottawa Citizen

07 November 1987

Tonda McCharles

Rev. Dale Crampton, the Nepean priest convicted of sexually assaulting seven altar boys, has denied that his conduct caused emotional difficulties for three of the youths who are now suing him.

Three Nepean boys and their parents are suing Crampton for assault and breach of duty, claiming severe psychological trauma.

Crampton, in a statement of defence against the claims, says the suffering of the three boys was precipitated and prolonged by the civil and criminal court actions against him.

Crampton was sentenced to an eight-month jail sentence for the assaults.

The Citizen won the right to examine Crampton’s statement of defence as well as statements of defence filed on behalf of his superior and the archdiocese after successfully challenging a court order to seal the file.

The three families have also sued Ottawa bishop Rev. John Beahan and the Catholic archdiocese for negligence in its supervision of the priest and its obligation to protect the congregation.

The lawsuit alleges the youths’ education and prospects for future income have been impaired because of the trauma they suffered.

The bishop and the archdiocese deny any responsibility for Crampton’s actions.

Beahan and the archdiocese have filed counter-claims against Crampton in the event damages are awarded. Crampton’s counter-claim against the church has been dropped.

The entire file was ordered sealed June 3 and stamped confidential by district court Judge Keith Flanigan at the request of the plaintiffs.

The Citizen was permitted to challenge the ruling after the court acknowledged it was a party affected by the file’s closure.

Richard Dearden, lawyer for Southam Inc., which owns the Citizen, argued the closure limited the newspaper’s freedom of expression as guaranteed by the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and contravened the principle that all judicial proceedings are open to the public.

Ontario Supreme Court Justice Elmer Smith agreed the principle of

open court proceedings should prevail.

“Suffice it to say that it (the section used to seal the file) ought to be resorted to sparingly in the clearest of cases and on the clearest of material.”

The judge reviewed statements from the parents and a doctor’s letter suggesting public scrutiny of the case would have a negative effect, but ruled he had “insufficient material” to make an exception to the rule of public access.

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Priest to be jailed in molesting case

The Vancouver Sun

02 July 1987

TORONTO – A Roman Catholic priest who molested seven altar boys has had his sentence increased to eight months in jail – instead of a suspended sentence – by the Ontario Court of Appeal.

Rev. Dale Crampton, 50, who pleaded guilty, received the suspended sentence last year with an order that he continue treatment for alcoholism and a sexual disorder.

But Justice J. W. Morden said Tuesday last year’s ruling had not given sufficient attention to Crampton’s “extreme form of breach of trust and breach of authority.”

Morden, speaking for a three-judge panel, said Crampton “must have known that what he was doing was wrong morally and legally.”

The assaults occurred over a 10-year period beginning in 1973, usually in a church rectory or at the priest’s cottage. Although one mother had complained to priests and a bishop about Crampton’s behavior, no charges were laid until 1986.

The boys, 12 or 13 years old at the time of the assaults, suffered great embarrassment over the incidents, Morden said.

“His trust in the priest was gone as well as his faith in the church,” he said of one victim. While none of the incidents involved threats of physical injury, some of the boys suffered “psychologicial, emotional and spiritual damage,” he noted.

Morden said reports show that Crampton, who was diagnosed as a homosexual pedophile and alcoholic, has considerable remorse for his actions and has made major progress under treatment.

Crown attorney Michael Bernstein said a bench warrant would be issued later this week for Crampton’s arrest. He now does administrative work in the archdiocese office in London, Ont.

Ken Hall, one of Crampton’s lawyers, said it was unusual for an appeal court to overturn a sentence of probation and impose a jail term.

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Priest’s pre-trial hearing delayed for ninth time

The Ottawa Citizen

05 December 1986

Sherri Baron

The pre-trial hearing of Rev. Dale Crampton was adjourned Thursday for the ninth time amid concerns the case is taking too long to proceed.

The 50-year-old Roman Catholic priest was charged in June with nine counts of indecent assault against young boys.

Defence lawyer Mike Neville said Thursday the adjournment until this afternoon was necessary because he wanted time to review material he received from Crown Attorney Andrejs Berzins Thursday morning.

He said Crampton would definitely not be entering a plea today. But a decision is to be made today either to waive the preliminary inquiry or to set a date for it, Neville added.

Neville and Berzins have been meeting regularly to discuss the case.

The families of the boys have been concerned about the delays in the proceedings.

Berzins confirmed Thursday he has held three meetings with various parents this week “to explain why the case is taking so long.”

“I asked to meet with them and I’m satisfied now that they understand.”

Regional vicar Peter Schonenbach said Thursday he’s “somewhat surprised” by the number of adjournments since Crampton made his first appearance June 14.

“It’s certainly not easy for Father Crampton that it’s taking so long to resolve this matter. On the other hand, you don’t want to proceed too quickly, you should not jeopardize that all’s being done properly.”

The charges against Crampton, who served nine years at St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church on Perry Street, involve five boys between the ages of 10 and 14.

The incidents allegedly occurred during a four-year period ending in 1980.

Crampton, while still a priest, has not been involved in any official duties since February when he left for a U.S. alcohol rehabilitation centre.

Gilles Deslauriers, a 49-year-old Roman Catholic priest, was sentenced in November to two years’ probation after pleading guilty to four charges of gross indecency involving four Cornwall youths aged 17 and 19 between 1979 and 1981.

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Accused priest makes first court appearance

The Ottawa Citizen

20 June 1986

John Major

A 50-year-old Nepean priest charged with nine counts of indecent assault involving five young boys made his first appearance in provincial court today and was told to return in August.

Rev. Dale Crampton, who had been at an alcohol treatment centre in Michigan, turned himself in to Nepean police Saturday.

This morning, Crampton was told to appear in court again Aug. 14. The charges against him were not read in court.

He was charged earlier this month after several boys and their parents complained to Nepean police.

Judge Robert Hutton granted the adjournment, partly to give Crampton’s lawyer, Michael Neville, time to see the Crown’s summary of evidence against his client.

The charges relate to incidents involving five boys, all alter servers, between the ages of 10 and 14. The incidents are said to have taken place in the priest’s residence, at his West Carleton Township cottage and at churches where Crampton served.

Crampton had been the parish priest at St. Maurice’s Parish on Perry Street off Meadowlands Drive for the past nine years.

Six of the charges involve assaults which allegedly took place between 1978 and 1980.

One of the charges is said to date back to when Crampton was priest at St. Phillip’s church in Richmond, between 1970 and 1973.

The other two charges relate to more recent events said to involve a boy at St. Maurice’s.

Crampton, although still a priest, has not been involved in any official duties since he left for the rehabilitation centre in Lake Orion in Michigan in February.

From 1975 to 1978, he was a trustee of the Ottawa Separate School Board.

He has also held an honorary post as padre of the Ottawa branch of the RCMP for 14 years.

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February 12, 1990  13.05 EST

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ottawa has paid $150,000 to the families of three altar boys who were sexually abused by a Nepean priest.

Archdiocese spokesman Msgr. Roger Morin confirmed Monday that the money was paid last fall in an out‑of‑court settlement. No other details were released.

The families sued Rev. Dale Crampton for assault and breach of duty after the priest was convicted in December 1987 of sexually assaulting seven altar boys during a 10‑year period.

The assaults took place overnight in rectories in Goulbourn Township, at Nepean churches and at Crampton’s cottage.

Crampton, 50, received an eight‑month sentence.

Bruce Carr‑Harris, a lawyer who represented the families, said after the October settlement that the families were pleased with the outcome. Carr‑Harris said they did not want the civil case to go to trial.

The families also sued Ottawa Bishop John Beahan, now deceased, and the archdiocese for negligence in its supervision of Crampton and its obligation to protect the congregation.

Crampton must pay a share of the settlement and the diocese had to cover for Beahan.

Adrian Hewitt, a lawyer for the archdiocese, said it has never acknowledged responsibility for Crampton’s actions. Hewitt said the families alleged Beahan had failed to properly supervise Crampton, but the archdiocese argued the bishop had no knowledge of his actions or propensity.

Morin said Crampton is still working for the church, but isn’t doing parish work and isn’t employed in the Ottawa area.

A pre‑trial hearing had been scheduled for March 16, but all parties said they hoped to reach a settlement before then to reduce publicity.

Hewitt said this is the first time the diocese has ever reached such a settlement.

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October 20, 1989  13.20 EDT

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

Ottawa’s Roman Catholic diocese has reached a financial settlement with the families of three altar boys who were sexually abused by  Dale Crampton, a priest from nearby Nepean.

Father Gilles Lavergne, diocese spokesman, confirmed Friday that an out‑of‑court settlement was reached Thursday.

No details of the settlement are being released. The families of the three boys have declined comment.

The families sued Crampton for assault and breach of duty after the priest was convicted in December 1987 of sexually assaulting seven altar boys over a 10‑year period. Crampton received an eight‑month sentence. The Crown has appealed the sentence.

The families also sued a former Ottawa bishop, John Beahan, who now is  deceased, and the Catholic archdiocese for negligence in its supervision of Crampton and its obligation to protect the congregation.

The lawsuit alleged the youths’ education and prospects for future income have been impaired because of the trauma they suffered.

The bishop and the archdiocese denied any responsibility for Crampton’s actions.

A pre‑trial hearing for the case had been set for March 16. But all parties involved in the case said they hoped to reach a settlement before then to reduce publicity.

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The Lawyers Weekly, 7:18

September 11, 1987

Section:  Weekly Digest

R. v. Crampton

Ontario Court of Appeal

per Morden J.A.

July 10, 1987 ‑ 17 pp.

(1987), 7 L.W. 718‑011

Criminal law ‑‑ Sentencing ‑‑ Indecent assault.

Crown appealed against suspension of passing of sentence and releasing of accused on probation for two years following his plea of guilty to seven counts of indecent assault. Accused, aged 50, was a Roman Catholic priest, trustee of local separate school board, honorary R.C.M.P. chaplain and church marriage tribunal judge. Offences, which had taken place between 1973 and 1982, all involved fondling of boys between ages of 9 and 13, several of them altar boys in his church, while they were in his care. There was evidence that all victims had suffered psychological, emotional and spiritual damage. Accused had been diagnosed as suffering from homosexual paedophilia and alcoholism. In 1986, after complaints had been made to church representatives but before complaints had been made to police, he had been voluntarily admitted to church‑run treatment facility. Reports indicated that he had responded well to treatment and showed considerable remorse for his behaviour, and that both his paedophilia and alcohol problem were in a state of remission. Crown submitted that trial judge had erred in principle in failing to impose a custodial term.

HELD: appeal allowed. Sentence imposed lay outside a fit range of sentences. Trial judge had failed to give proper weight to extreme form of breach of trust involved in offences; youth and corresponding vulnerability of victims at a very important time in their lives with respect to their sexual development; impact of offences on victims and their families and fact that offences had taken place over a substantial period. Fact that accused had sought treatment before charges had been laid must be considered with fact that accused, an intelligent man, must have known that what he was doing was wrong both morally and legally, and fact that he had continued in such behaviour for 10 years without seeking help. Incarceration properly expressed public abhorrence and Court repudiation of such conduct. Sentence of imprisonment for 8 months should accordingly be imposed.

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March 2, 1989  15.33 EST

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

Catholic Church officials want an out‑of‑court settlement with three families suing the Ottawa diocese and a priest convicted of sexually assaulting young altar boys, the Ottawa Citizen says.

The three families have launched civil suits against the diocese and Rev. Dale Crampton. A pre‑trial hearing is set for March 16.

But the church is pushing to settle the lawsuit out of court to avoid publicity, the Citizen said Thursday, citing sources.

Church officials are also worried any damages awarded by a court could set a dangerous precedent, the newspaper said.

“(The church) is getting anxious this hasn’t been settled yet,” the paper quotes a source close to the families as saying.

Crampton is being sued for assault and breach of duty after he was convicted in December 1987 of sexually assaulting seven altar boys over a 10‑year period.

The source said the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops is worried about potential lawsuits arising from recent charges against priests in Newfoundland.

Six priests or former priests in Newfoundland have been charged with or convicted of sexually abusing young boys in the last year.

But Archbishop James Hayes, president of the bishops’ organization, said he hasn’t been involved in the case.

Rev. Pat Powers, spokesman for Ottawa Archbishop Joseph‑Aurele Plourde, would not discuss the Crampton case.

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November 6, 1987

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

Rev. Dale Crampton, the Nepean, Ont. priest convicted of indecently assaulting seven altar boys, denies that his conduct caused the youths emotional difficulty.

Three Nepean boys and their parents are suing Crampton for assault and breach of duty, claiming severe psychological trauma.

Crampton, in a statement of defence against the claims, says the boys’ suffering was precipitated and prolonged by the civil and criminal court actions against him.

Crampton was sentenced to eight months in jail for the assaults.

The families are also suing Ottawa Bishop Rev. John Beahan and the Catholic archdiocese for negligence in their supervision of the priest and their obligation to protect the congregation.

The lawsuit alleges the youths’ education and prospects for future income have been impaired by the trauma they suffered.

The bishop and the archdiocese deny responsibility for Crampton’s actions and have filed counter‑claims against Crampton in the event damages are awarded.

The Ottawa Citizen won the right to examine the statements of defence after challenging a court order to seal the file. The order was made by district court Judge Keith Flanigan at the request of the plaintiffs.

Richard Dearden, lawyer for Southam Inc., which owns the Citizen, argued that closure of the file limited the newspaper’s freedom of expression as guaranteed by the Charter of Rights, and contravened the principle that all judicial proceedings are open to the public.

Ontario Supreme Court Justice Elmer Smith agreed the principle of open court proceedings should prevail.

The parents and a doctor argued that public scrutiny of the case would have a negative effect on the boys, but the judge said he had insufficient material to make an exception to the rule of public access.

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June 30, 1987

Canadian Press

TORONTO (CP)

A Roman Catholic priest who molested seven altar boys has had his sentence increased to eight months in jail  ‑‑ instead of a suspended sentence ‑‑ by the Ontario Court of Appeal.

Rev. Dale Crampton, 50, who had pleaded guilty, received the suspended sentence last year with an order that he continue treatment for alcoholism and a sexual disorder.

But Mr. Justice J. W. Morden said Tuesday last year’s ruling had not given sufficient attention to Crampton’s “extreme form of breach of trust and breach of authority.”

Morden, speaking for a three‑judge panel, said Crampton “must have known that what he was doing was wrong morally and legally.”

The assaults occurred over a 10‑year period beginning in 1973, usually in a church rectory or at the priest’s cottage. Although one mother had complained to priests and a bishop about Crampton’s behavior, no charges were laid until 1986.

The boys, 12 or 13 years old at the time of the assaults, suffered great embarrassment over the incidents, Morden said.

“His trust in the priest was gone as well as his faith in the church,” he  said of one victim. While none of the incidents involved threats of physical injury, some of the boys suffered “psychologicial, emotional and spiritual damage,” he noted.

Crampton began treatment before being charged and was diagnosed as a homosexual pedophile and alcoholic, Morden noted. But he said reports show he has considerable remorse for his actions and has made major progress under treatment.

Crown attorney Michael Bernstein said a bench warrant would be issued later this week for Crampton’s arrest. He now does administrative work in the archdiocese office in London, Ont.

Ken Hall, one of Crampton’s lawyers, said Tuesday it was unusual for an appeal court to overturn a sentence of probation and impose a jail term.

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January 16, 1987

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

The Crown attorney’s office in Toronto is appealing the sentence given a Nepean, Ont., priest who pleaded guilty in December to indecent assaults against seven young altar servers.

Rev. Dale Crampton, 50, was given a suspended sentence, placed on probation for two years and ordered by district court Judge Keith Flanigan to take psychiatric counselling.

The Roman Catholic priest, who has not been involved in official church duties since February, was described in court as an alcoholic with a sexual preference for boys.

He apologized after the sentencing for the incidents, which spanned 10 years and occurred in the rectories of churches in nearby Richmond, Ont., Nepean, and at his cottage.

The official handling the case in Toronto could not be reached to explain reasons for the appeal.

But Ottawa Crown Attorney Andrejs Berzins said he expects incarceration is being sought. Berzins sought a jail term of nine months to one year.

Flanigan rejected jail, saying it would not serve either Crampton or the community, which he said Crampton still had a great deal to offer.

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December 23, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

A Nepean, Ont., priest described in court as an alcoholic with a sexual preference for boys was given a suspended sentence and placed on probation for two years after he pleaded guilty to seven counts of indecent assault before a district courtroom full of church members, the victims and their families.

“I am well aware that no one need accept my request for forgiveness,” Rev. Dale Crampton, 50, said in a statement.

The assaults, which consisted mainly of fondling of the boys’ genitals, spanned over 10 years and occurred in the rectories of Ontario churches in Richmond and Nepean, as well as at Crampton’s cottage in West Carleton.

None of the victims, who at the time of the incidents ranged in age from 10 to 13, were threatened or injured.

The Roman Catholic priest was ordered to take long‑term treatment for his alcohol addiction and the pedophilia, and told to stay away unsupervised from boys under 16 by District Court Judge Keith Flanigan. Pedophilia is the sexual preference for children.

In passing sentence, Flanigan described Crampton as “man of God” who had breached a sacred trust.

But he also called the priest highly respected, motivated to change, with much to offer the community.

Flanigan said a jail term suggested by the Crown was not the best way to protect society, or to stop Crampton from committing the crime again.

SHAMED ARCHDIOCESE

Crampton apologized in the statement for the shame he has brought his colleagues at the Ottawa Archdiocese, saying the crimes were his and not those of the church.

Crampton has been diagnosed since the incidents with the boys ended in 1982 as an alcoholic and pedophiliac. Court was told Crampton consumed up to 20 ounces of alcohol each day, something he’d been doing since 1970.

Parents of the victims said the sentence was too lenient.

“As a group we felt incarceration of some sort would have been appropriate,” said one father. By court order, none of the boys can be identified. To name the parents would lead to the identity of their children.

The victims and their parents said in statements read into court by Crown Attorney Andrejs Berzins before sentencing they were left troubled and confused by the fondling incidents. Most had stopped attending mass and said their faith in the church was shaken.

Still a priest, Crampton has not performed official duties since February. He served for nine years as parish priest at St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church in Nepean. Before that he was a priest for three years at St. Phillip’s Church in Richmond, Ont., about 25 kilometres south west of Ottawa.

Defence lawyer Michael Neville said Crampton will remain a priest with administrative duties.

Neville sought a suspended sentence with probation and long‑term treatment, saying society was best protected if Crampton were cared for by doctors and psychiatrists rather than be incarcerated.

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December 4, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

The pre‑trial hearing of Rev. Dale Crampton was adjourned for the ninth time Thursday until today to allow his defence lawyer time to review information related to the case.

The 50‑year‑old Roman Catholic priest was charged in June with nine counts of indecent assault involving five young boys between the ages of 10 to 14 during a four‑year period ending in 1980.

Defence lawyer Mike Neville said the adjournment until today was necessary because he wanted time to review material he received from Crown Attorney Andrejs Berzins Thursday morning.

Neville said Crampton, who served nine years at St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church in nearby Nepean, Ont., would not be entering a plea today.

Gilles Deslauriers, a 49‑year‑old Roman Catholic priest, was sentenced in November to two years’ probation after pleading guilty to four charges of gross indecency involving four Cornwall, Ont., youths aged 17 and 19 between 1979 and 1981.

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November 5, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

The time‑consuming preliminary inquiry into sexual assault charges against Rev. Dale Crampton may be waived if the Crown Attorney can persuade the priest’s lawyer to agree, provincial court was told Wednesday.

Judge Robert Hutton agreed to Crown Attorney Andrejs Berzins’ request for an adjournment until Nov. 20 after Berzins said he wants to give additional information to Mike Neville, Crampton’s lawyer.

Crampton, who served nine years at St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church, faces nine charges of indecent assault allegedly involving boys ‑‑ all altar servers ‑‑ aged 10 to 14, over a four‑year period ending in 1980.

The charges were laid following a police investigation prompted by complaints from several boys and their parents.

Crampton, 50, has not been involved in any official duties since February when he left for an alcohol rehabilitation centre in Lake Orion, Michigan.

He returned to Canada and surrendered to police June 14.

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October 16, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

The trial of Rev. Dale Crampton was delayed in provincial court Thursday for the fifth time since he was charged in June with sexually assaulting five young boys.

Michael Neville, defence lawyer for the 50‑year‑old priest, asked Judge Jean‑Marie Bordeleau for a delay until Oct. 30 because Crown Attorney John Campbell was busy in district court.

Crampton, who stood at the back of the court Thursday dressed in a suit, was expected to enter a plea of guilty or not guilty.

Crampton served nine years at St. Maurice Roman Catholic Church in Nepean, Ont. The incidents are said to have involved boys, all altar servers aged 10 to 14, over a four‑year period ending in 1980.

Crampton’s previous court appearance on Oct. 2 was delayed when Neville asked for a two‑week postponement because he wanted time to review the Crown’s evidence against his client. The funeral of Crampton’s father, William James Crampton, a retired RCMP sargeant, caused another delay.

The charges were laid against Crampton following a Nepean police investigation that was prompted by complaints by several boys and their parents.

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October 2, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

Rev. Dale Crampton, a Roman Catholic priest charged with nine counts of sexual assault on boys, appeared in court briefly Thursday and was granted a two‑week trial delay at the request of his lawyer.

Crampton, a 50‑year‑old priest in nearby Nepean Ont., has already appeared twice and missed another court date because of the death of his father.

He is to appear before Judge Jean‑Marie Bordeleau Oct. 16.

His lawyer Michale Neville asked for the delay because he still hasn’t completely reviewed the crown’s evidence against his client, who has yet to enter a plea to the charges.

The incidents are said to have occurred during a four‑year perioid ending in 1980.

Crampton has served for nine years at St. Maurice parish.

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September 11, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

Rev. Dale Crampton, a Roman Catholic priest charged with nine counts of sexual assault on boys, did not appear in court today as scheduled because of the death of his father.

William James Crampton, a former RCMP employee, died Tuesday and his funeral was to be held today about two hours after his son’s scheduled court appearance.

Judge James Fontana of provincial court issued a bench warrant for the 50‑year‑old priest, but that was only a routine procedure to ensure the court retains jurisdiction in the case. Police will not be instructed to arrest Crampton, but if the warrant hadn’t been issued they would have had to lay charges again.

Crampton is scheduled to appear again in court Oct. 2, but his lawyer Michael Neville said it will be a brief appearance because he still hasn’t had time to review all the Crown’s evidence.

Crampton has not entered a plea on the nine charges involving alleged incidents with five boys aged 10 to 14. The incidents are said to have occurred during a four‑year period ending in 1980.

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June 20, 1986

Canadian Press

OTTAWA (CP)

A 50‑year‑old Roman Catholic priest, charged with nine counts of indecent assault involving five young boys, made his first appearance in provincial court today and was told to return in August.

Rev. Dale Crampton, who had been at an alcohol treatment centre in Michigan, turned himself in to police in suburban Nepean Saturday.

He was told today to appear in court again Aug. 14. The charges against him were not read in court.

He was charged earlier this month after several boys and their parents complained to police.

Judge Robert Hutton granted the adjournment partly to give Crampton’s lawyer, Michael Neville, time to see the Crown’s summary of evidence against his client.

The charges relate to incidents involving five boys, all altar servers, between the ages of 10 and 14. The incidents are alleged to have taken place in the priest’s residence, at his West Carleton Township cottage and at churches where Crampton served.

Crampton had been the parish priest at St. Maurice’s Parish in Nepean for the past nine years.

Six of the charges involve assaults which allegedly took place between 1978 and 1980. One of the charges dates from when Crampton was priest at St. Phillip’s church in Richmond, Ont., between 1970 and 1973. The other two charges relate to more recent events alleged to involve a boy at St. Maurice’s.

Crampton, although still a priest, has not been involved in any official duties since he left for the rehabilitation centre in Lake Orion in Michigan in February.

From 1975 to 1978, he was a trustee of the Ottawa Separate School Board. He has also held an honorary post as padre of the Ottawa branch of the RCMP for 14 years.

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June 2, 1986

Canadain Press

OTTAWA (CP)

A 50‑year‑old priest from suburban Nepean has been charged with six counts of sexual abuse involving three young boys between 1978 and 1980, police said Monday.

Rev. Dale Crampton, pastor for nine years of St. Maurice parish, will appear in court when he returns from an alcohol‑ abuse treatment centre in Michigan in two weeks, a spokesmansaid.

Insp. Ron Lamont said he has been assured by officials of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ottawa that Crampton will voluntarily return to face the charges when the treatment program is complete.

“This would be a lot quicker than (extradition),” Lamont said.

Crampton served for two years as a trustee for the Ottawa Separate School Board and is padre for the Ottawa branch of the RCMP, a largely honorary post.

The alleged victims, all altar servers at the parish, were between the ages of 10 and 14 at the time the incidents are alleged to have taken place at the priest’s residence at the church and at his West Carleton Township cottage.

Lamont refused to release any details of the nature of the charges.

LASHES MEDIA

Archbishop Joseph‑Aurele Plourde, in a statement released within a half‑hour of the charges being laid, criticized local news media for past reports ‑‑ carried while the investigation was under way but before charges were laid ‑‑ and also criticized members of Crampton’s congregation for going public with their allegations.

“The only effect could be to provoke indiscriminate speculation without any foundation in fact,” said the bishop’s statement.

“It is suprising that a society which strives to promote human rights would allow the media and public officials to make such statements before charges were laid.”

Plourde singled out one St. Maurice parishioner for criticism, saying he “claims to be inspired by the Holy Spirit and to be entrusted with a mission to cleanse the church of homosexuals.”

Crampton has been a part‑time judge for the Ottawa Ecclesiastical Tribunal for the past two years, ruling on about 14 requests for marriage annulment.

Judicial Vicar Jean‑Louis Plouffe said the cases were only a small portion of the 400 handled by the tribunal each year, and they would not be affected by any action taken against Crampton in the wake of charges.

Crampton has been at a rehabilitation centre in Lake Orion, Mich., since February for alcohol abuse treatment and “a complete psychological assessment,” according to diocese officials.

5 Responses to Crampton: Father Dale Crampton

  1. Baspuit says:

    OTTAWA – A pedophile priest convicted in the 1980s of sexually assaulting seven altar boys killed himself Tuesday.

    Though police are not confirming his identity, sources say the man found dead at the base of a 24-storey west-end highrise is Dale Crampton.

    A neighbour discovered him next to the building at about 5 a.m. The disgraced former priest had leapt to his death.

    Crampton, who at one time was highly revered in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese at Ottawa’s St. Maurice parish, pleaded guilty in 1986 to indecently assaulting seven altar boys over the course of about a decade.

    The one-time Catholic school board trustee and RCMP chaplain served eight months in prison.

    “It was a tragic story all the way through,” said Ottawa Police Sgt. Al McConnell, who led the investigation that ended in Crampton’s conviction. “There was a lot of damaged boys and people slamming doors in our faces because they couldn’t believe at that time a priest could be (molesting boys). He was a very popular priest and a lot of people had difficulties with that case.”

    The conviction wasn’t the end of Crampton’s sordid story.

    Crampton’s misdeeds came back to haunt him last year when a historical victim, only known publicly as Alex, launched a $2-million civil lawsuit against Crampton and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ottawa.

    The 41-year-old claimant was a 14-year-old altar boy when Crampton sexually molested him as they watched a hockey game in the rectory of St. Maurice parish.

    The Archdiocese of Ottawa came to an undisclosed settlement with the victim on Oct. 9, 2009. Just over a year later, Crampton is dead, leaving only a note with instructions detailing whom to contact about his death and little else.

    Calls to the Archdiocese of Ottawa for comment were not immediately returned Wednesday.

    Throughout the 2009 case, another six victims came forward, said Rob Talach, the London, Ont., lawyer who represented Alex.

    “They ranged from ambivalence to true sadness. I mean, no one celebrates the loss of life,” Talach said of the victims’ reactions to news of Crampton’s death.

    “There was a common theme that those in the process of seeking some form of closure felt that would now be incomplete.”

    McConnell couldn’t confirm Crampton’s death Wednesday, but said if true, “it closes a very unpleasant chapter in a lot of people’s lives.”

    “This whole thing has been a tragedy, not only for the victims, but for the church, for the state, for society and for the priest himself,” McConnell said.

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    This from : http://www.torontosun.com/news/canada/2010/10/14/15684461.html

  2. Stephanie Jameson says:

    Dale Crampton was molesting, and attempting to molest, boys in Ottawa since the 1960’s (not to mention what he did before he was ordained). Can you imagine what he did in Africa? That’s 47 years and hundreds of boys. Even his choice of suicide type was a public display and form of mass trauma, assuming he fell to a public place. Career sex offender.

  3. Paul says:

    Yep, Crampton tried to engage me once in conversation, probably around 1979 at Pius X, I thought he was kind of strange for doing it, and I suspected years later that he wanted to ‘hook up’ (so it turns out I was right).

    Weird energy, let’s just hope he really did kill himself, and didn’t fake it.

    Real predatory, in hindsight. If he tried to hook up with me, a 15 year old at the time, then that’s what he had on his mind all the time. Just looking for an opportunity wherever it may be. Catholic church, eh. Well, @#$% religion, right?

  4. Paul says:

    ‘the rectory’

    how appropriate

    you can’t make this @#$ up.

  5. P says:

    Father Crampton engaged in inappropriate talk and behavior with me during confession.

    He approached my family about becoming an altar boy.

    I am an atheist now.

    I know I’m late to the party, but I hope his real victims find real justice and peace.

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