Gallien: Father Arthur Gallien

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Father Arthur Gallien

Priest Diocese of Bathurst, New Brunswick.  Ordained 28 June 1925. (The Bathurst diocese was previously  the Diocese of Chatham, and prior to that was the Diocese of St. John America)

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Father Arthur Gallien, third from left in front row circa 1941 (Dyre O Cormier photographer website)

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Father Arthur Gallien c 1941

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Above group photo is from Dyre O Cormier photographer website.  English text accompanying photo as follows:

Photo probably taken next to the Neguac Catholic Church on June 15, 1941 on the occasion of the Ordination to the priesthood of Edgar Godin of Fair Isle. In front: Fr. Edgar Godin, Most Rev. Patrice-Alexandre Chiasson, Bishop of Bathurst and Fr. Arthur Gallien, Pastor in Neguac. Edgar Godin was Bishop of Bathurst from 1969 to his death in 1985. The persons in the rear are probably members of the Godin family.

P214/390

Lawsuit filed October 2016 alleging sexual abuse by Father Galien  when plaintiff was a parishioner at Saint-Bernard Parish in Neguac and  St. Georges in Covedell

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Bishops during Father Arthur Gallien’s years as a priest:   Patrice Alexandre Chiasson, C.I.M. † (09 September 1920  – 31 January 1942 ); Camille-André Le Blanc  (25 July 1942 – 08 January 1969 ); Edgar Godin  (09 June 1969  – 06 April 1985 ); Arsène Richard  (15 November 1985  – 06 January 1989 ); and perhaps André Richard, C.S.C. (20 May 1989 – 16 March 2002 )

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High School in Neguac is named after Father Arthur Gallien (High School in Neguac named after Father Gallien)

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Unless otherwise indicated, the following information is drawn from the Canadian Catholic Church Directory publications (CCCD) which I have on hand, and media (M)

 

1983:  Died.  Date of death unknown

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Headstone in Caraquet garveyard

1985:  Villa Beausejour, Cariquet (CCCD) This is obviously an error, but it may indicate that he spent the last months or perhaps years prior to his death in 1983 at the Villa Beausejour in Caraquet.

 

 

 

 

1973-74:  listed as retired.  Address listed as Bas-Caraquet New Brunswick (CCCD)

– diocesan consultor (CCCD)

– cures consulteirs (CCCD)

1971-72:  mailing address for St. Polycarpe Roman Catholic Church,  Petit Rocher, New Brunswick , but Monsignor Donat Xhaiasson, the Vicar General and a future bishop, is listed and shown as Pastor at St. Polycarpe (CCCD)

1970:  Honorary member of the Nicolas-Denys Historical Society (Father Arthur Gallien-Nicolys-Denys Historical Society)

1968-69, 1967:  Pastor, St. Polycarpe Roman Catholic Church,  Petit Rocher, New Brunswick (CCCD

–  diocesan consultor (CCCD)

– cures consulteirs (CCCD)

– assisted in introduction and naming of what is now known in Petit Rocher as the Rowing Festival ( Father Gallien-Rowing Festival)

The rowers Festival takes place in July. It all started in 1967, during the 100 years of Confederation, the parish had as a project to organize the crossing of the Bay of Chaleur in rowboat. The event was such a great success that came the desire to see all the years. At the reception of the rowers, Bishop Arthur Gallien, parish priest at that time, we had assévènementuré that the festival would be called “Rowing Festival”. The following year, so in 1968, the Festival was born under the chairmanship of Edmond Boudreau with the help of Bishop Gallien.

Every year, good weather, bad weather, the crossing brings thousands of people to the site of the finish called “Place of Rowing” to accommodate the rowers.

The Festival is a sports and cultural annual event holding the second week of July whose principal activity is the crossing of the Bay of Chaleur a distance of about 35 km (22 miles) or Bonaventure, Quebec Petit-Rocher, NB, whaling by 5 or 5 rowers rowers.

1959:  Pastor, St. Bernard Roman Catholic Church, Neguac (assistant, Father Elphege Chiasson) (CCCD)

– cures consulteirs (CCCD)

1955:  seems to have had something to do with films?  Could someone take a look at page 2 of this Silhouettes Spring 2005 publication?  ( From Suzanne:  “The article is about the Provincial Archives looking for home movies, or rather, amateur films. Father Gallien is mentioned because he filmed a lot of the Acadian Peninsula’s celebrations of the 200th anniversary of the Deportation of the Acadians back in 1955 while he was in Neguac.” )

 October 1950:  flew to Rome with six other priests for the proclamation of  the dogma of Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Father Gallien to Rome).  The following is a google translation:

Seven priests go to Rome for the proclamation of the dogma of the Assumption, by plane “Pilgrim Acadian”, starting with October 26: the Rev. Arthur Gallien (Neguac), Rodolphe Doucet (Lagacéville); Willie Brideau (Balmoral), Leo Gagnon (Allardville), Félix Léger (St. Raphael), Ernest Chiasson (Dundee), Honoré Marquis (St-Isidore). (P. 1)

May 1950  & March 1951:  Pastor, St. Bernard Roman Catholic Church, Neguac (external link:  La Voix du Passe, July 1999,  pp 11 & 12)

1935:  Responsible for relocation of a French school  (Father Gallien -school -original French text) The following, thanks to Suzanne,  is a “tweaked” Google translation of the relevant portion of the text.

Later in the 1920s, they built a new school in the center of Rivière du Portage along the current Caisse Populaire road. This school also served some students of the Bay (Baie Ste.-Anne).
And the time there was no school in Baie Ste.-Anne. That situation was not rectified until 1935. Escuminac had its own school and there was the school in Bois-Franc which served only 6 students from Bois-Franc while the other 72 were from the Bay.

Monsignor Arthur Gallien was pastor here at the time time and he was determined to get that school out of the woods and transported to a parcel of land along the main highway in a central area where the bulk of the population lived. But the School Commissioners, most of them Anglophones, were not of the same opinion. Wanting to calm the situation, the Inspector of schools wrote to the commissioners saying that the school would not be moved, and to Father Gallien, a letter saying that the school would be moved. I don’t know by what ruse Father Gallien managed to get hold of the Commissioners’ letter, but armed with the two contradictory letters, he hurriedly headed for Chatham straight to the School Inspectors’. Arriving he said: “Mr. Inspector, you are a two-faced man! First letter, first face; second letter, second face.” In order to avoid a further loss of face, the Inspector saw himself obliged to not too strongly oppose the relocation of the school.

1927:  assisting at Roman Catholic Church in Rogersville, New Brunswick ( line 76 Father Gallien-Chatham Diocese 1927  )

28 June 1925:  ORDAINED

21 February 1901:  born ( line 76 Father Gallien-Chatham Diocese 1927  )

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Five new sex abuse lawsuits filed against Catholic Church

Moncton Times & Transcript

Saturday, October 8th, 2016

CRAIG BABSTOCK Times & Transcript

Five lawsuits have been filed against the Catholic Church in recent weeks, alleging sexual abuse by several New Brunswick priests, including the former chaplain at l’Université de Moncton.

Two men from Shediac and one from Riverview have filed separate lawsuits in Moncton, accusing priests of sexually abusing them as youths and the Catholic Church of enabling the abuse that dates back to the 1950s. The plaintiffs in all three Moncton cases are identified only by initials.

Two lawsuits have also been filed in Edmundston against a former priest in that northwestern New Brunswick community.

No statements of defence have been filed in any of the cases and none of the allegations made have been challenged or proven in court.

Yvon Arsenault and the Moncton Archdiocese are named in one of the Moncton lawsuits. Arsenault is accused of committing the abuse while he was a priest in Shediac.

During his time as an active priest he served in Moncton, Shediac, Bouctouche,Scoudouc,Dorchester, Baie Sainte-Anne and several other places.

Arsenault, the Moncton Archdiocese and priest Paul Breau are listed as defendants in the second lawsuit in Moncton. The abuse in that case is again alleged to have occurred while the two priests served in Shediac.

During his career, Breau served in Moncton, Shediac, Dieppe and was also chaplain at Notre-Dame d’Acadie on the Université de Moncton campus.

In a third lawsuit filed in Moncton, the defendants are the Bathurst Diocese and priest Normand Dugas. That lawsuit also accuses two other priests, now deceased, of sexual abuse.

Arsenault, now in his mid-70s, is awaiting trial later this month on more than a dozen sexual offences. He was suspended indefinitely by the Moncton Archdiocese in January 2013 when allegations of abuse were raised.

The Moncton Archdiocese sent out a news release late Thursday afternoon that said the archdiocese learned of the civil action against Breau on Oct. 5 and “is saddened by the news.

“While Father Breau had an excellent record, we will in accordance with our policy for the protection of minors and vulnerable persons, suspend Father Breau from any further activities as a cleric pending the outcome of the court case,” said Moncton Archbishop Valéry Vienneau.

The archbishop says the diocese has committed itself to a “stringent anti-abuse protocol” and has taken steps to resolve the claims of victims of sexual abuse, particularly those that came forward over the past several years through the reconciliation process led by former Supreme Court of Canada Justice Michel Bastarache. That process paid compensation to victims who came forward.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with all victims and with the great majority of clerics who carry out their duties day-in and day-out to spread the Gospel and follow Christ’s example,” said the archbishop, who added that no further comment will be made on the legal matters.

The Times & Transcript reached Breau by phone on Thursday and he declined to discuss either his suspension or the allegations contained in the statement of claim.

“I won’t answer any questions, I don’t want to talk about it,”said Breau.

According to the court document, the plaintiff in the case against Breau and Arsenault was a young teen in the mid-1980s who, as part of his community service requirements in Shediac, raked leaves in the yard surrounding the parish of St-Joseph. Arsenault and Breau were in charge of overseeing that youth’s work and keeping track of his hours.

The allegation is that both priests used their position of authority to exploit the “priest-parishioner relationship,” prey upon the youth, and sexually abuse him over a period of time.

The archdiocese is accused of empowering and enabling the priests to commit the misconduct. The court document says the archdiocese is responsible for the priest’s actions and was “negligent, wilfully blind and maintained a system to cover up such activities.”

The statement of claim says the plaintiff suffered mental, physical and emotional stress.

There is no specific request for damages in the document, which was filed by Moncton lawyer Brian Murphy, who could not be reached for comment on Friday. Murphy also submitted the claim by the Riverview plaintiff against Arsenault and the archdiocese.

According to that statement of claim, Arsenault had asked the pre-teen boy to meet him at the Rectory of St-Joseph one weekend. The plaintiff alleges the priest sexually abused him on that occasion and “numerous” others, by using his position of authority to exert control over him.

Also in this lawsuit, the archdiocese is accused of being negligent, responsible for Arsenault’s actions, wilfully blind to the situation and maintaining a system that covered up such activities.

The plaintiff states he suffered a variety of repercussions from the abuse and is claiming unspecified damages.

The lawsuit against the Bathurst Diocese and priest Normand Dugas alleges sexual abuse by Dugas and two other priests – Arthur Gallien and Ubald Theriault – who are both deceased. The Shediac-based plaintiff says the abuse occurred when he was a parishioner in the Saint-Bernard Parish in Neguac and Church of St. Georges in Covedell.

The statement of claim alleges Gallien abused him for two years starting in 1959 and facilitated the abuse by making the youth feel like“he was special in the eyes of Gallien, the Church and God.”

Dugas and Theriault are alleged to have committed similar abuses against the plaintiff in the 1960s.

The accusation against the diocese is that the priests were put in a position of power and the diocese was negligent for failing in its duty to the plaintiff.

The claim is the diocese allowed the abuse to take place without proper supervision and failed to take action.

Damages are sought but in no specific amount.

Moncton lawyer Rene LeBlanc is representing the plaintiff in the case against the Bathurst Diocese.

In an interview Friday, he said he has represented more than 40 people in his practice who claimed abused by priests when they were young and that they are always difficult cases.

“I’ve had a 75-year-old man in my office crying about something that happened to them when they were eight,” said LeBlanc.“It’s a powerful experience. It’s not easy for them to talk about.”

LeBlanc said he has not yet completed the process for establishing compensation sought.

LeBlanc says he’s represented victims who went through the Catholic Church’s reconciliation and compensation process and also clients who have gone the civil court route. In this case, he said, his client came forward after the compensation process had ended and his lone option was filing the lawsuit.

“Victims have their own timelines. They all don’t come forward right away,” says LeBlanc.“A lot of them wrestle with it and hold it in and some never come forward.”

He says the effects of childhood abuse include depression, anxiety, shame, difficulty forming relationships, drug addiction and problems with authority.

LeBlanc says it’s too early to say if this matter can be settled, but he credits the church with always being willing to “come to the table” and discuss the issues.

In the two Edmundston lawsuits, the priest alleged to have committed the molestation is Rino Deschenes.

He’s a defendant, along with the Edmundston Diocese and the bishop.

Both plaintiffs – Yvon Thibodeau and Marcel Thibodeau – allege in their statements of claim that Deschenes abused them between the ages of 9 and 13 while they served as altar boys.

The court document states the boy’s parents told Bishop Claude Champagne what was happening and he transferred the priest to another parish.

– With files from the Victoria Star

2 Responses to Gallien: Father Arthur Gallien

  1. Suzanne Mealey says:

    Hi, I took the liberty of tweaking that translation from the French.

    Later in the 1920s, they built a new school in the center of Rivière du Portage along the current Caisse Populaire road. This school also served some students of the Bay (Baie Ste.-Anne).
    And the time there was no school in Baie Ste.-Anne. That situation was not rectified until 1935. Escuminac had its own school and there was the school in Bois-Franc which served only 6 students from Bois-Franc while the other 72 were from the Bay.

    Monsignor Arthur Gallien was pastor here at the time time and he was determined to get that school out of the woods and transported to a parcel of land along the main highway in a central area where the bulk of the population lived. But the School Commissioners, most of them Anglophones, were not of the same opinion. Wanting to calm the situation, the Inspector of schools wrote to the commissioners saying that the school would not be moved, and to Father Gallien, a letter saying that the school would be moved. I don’t know by what ruse Father Gallien managed to get hold of the Commissioners’ letter, but armed with the two contradictory letters, he hurriedly headed for Chatham straight to the School Inspectors’. Arriving he said: “Mr. Inspector, you are a two-faced man! First letter, first face; second letter, second face.” In order to avoid a further loss of face, the Inspector saw himself obliged to not too strongly oppose the relocation of the school.

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